ha6l:

thrzd:

fotojournalismus:

Day 7: Israeli troops kill Palestinian stone-thrower in West Bank, Gaza running out of medical supplies as Palestinian death toll passes 172, OCHA estimates 25,300 children are in need of psychosocial support | July 14, 2014

1. A young Palestinian boy poses in front of a tarpaulin hiding a destroyed building following an Israeli air strike in Gaza City. (Thomas Coex/AFP/Getty Images)

2. Relatives of three Palestinian members of Abu Muamar family, who were killed in an Israeli air strike on their house, mourn next to one of the bodies during their funeral in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip. (Ibraheem Abu Mustafa/Reuters)

3. A Palestinian inspects a house which was damaged in an Israeli air strike that destroyed a neighbouring house in Deir El-Balah in the central Gaza Strip. (Ibraheem Abu Mustafa/Reuters)

4. Palestinian girls mourn before the funeral of their uncle, Adham Abed el-Al, who was killed in an Israeli airstrike in Gaza a day earlier. (Mohammed Asad/APA)

5. A Palestinian boy walks amongst the rubble of a house which was destroyed in an Israeli air strike in Deir El-Balah. (Ibraheem Abu Mustafa/Reuters)

6. Four-year-old Palestinian girl Shayma Al-Masri, who was wounded in an Israeli air strike that killed her mother and two of her siblings, lies on a bed next to her doll as she receives treatment at a hospital in Gaza City. (Mohammed Salem/Reuters)

7. Palestinians look at damaged cars amid the rubble of destroyed buildings following an Israeli air strike. (Thomas Coex/AFP/Getty Images)

8. Palestinians, who fled their family homes in the northern border town of Beit Lahiya, stay at a United Nations-run school in Gaza City. (Mohammed Salem/Reuters)

9. Palestinians look at a missile which was fired by an Israeli aircraft, as they stand in front of a house which was destroyed in an Israeli air strike in Gaza City. (Mohammed Salem/Reuters)

10. A Palestinian woman reacts in front of the remains of her house, which was destroyed in an Israeli air strike, in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip. (Ibraheem Abu Mustafa/Reuters)

(Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4 | Naming the dead)

💔💔

يا الله .. أنت وليّهم

Reblogged from Palestina

5centsapound:

Zed Nelson: The Keys of Palestine

via instituteartists:

The declaration of the establishment of the State of Israel took place on 14 May, 1948.

Every year since, on May 14th, Israel celebrates its ‘Day of Independence’ a national holiday marked by family meetings, fireworks, barbecues, picnics and concerts. 

The Palestinians mark the same day every year, but they call it the ‘Nakba’ meaning catastrophe.

Palestinian refugees still keep the keys to their former homes which they fled during the Arab-Israeli conflict in 1948. When war broke out and Arab armies went to war with the newly self-declared state of Israel, thousands of Palestinians fled their homes. They initially believed their exile was to be brief. In the manner of other civilians who are forced to abandon their homes in the midst of battle, they assumed they would return to resume the life they had left behind.

It was for this reason that many of them carefully locked their front doors as they left. Those who had time also diligently collected their deeds of ownership to property, the maps of their orange groves and fields, their tax returns and their identity papers going back to Ottoman times - and packed them into bags and tins along with their front door keys.

But by one of the more subtle cruelties of Middle East history, the keys were to prove the most symbolic and most worthless of possessions to the Palestinians. An estimated 700,000 Palestinians fled or were expelled, and hundreds of Palestinian towns and villages were depopulated and destroyed. These keys acquired a significance that grew ever more painful as weeks and then months away from home turned into years. The next generation of young Palestinians can remember how their parents became increasingly angry as the true meaning of these possessions became clear; because they proved ownership of a world that had disappeared. The new owners of those homes in the newly declared state of Israel forbade any return.

The keys are still kept by Palestinian families today symbolic of the enduring demand of their ‘right to return’ the dream of returning to the land and homes they left behind. 

Reblogged from Arab Swag
Tags: nakba

fotojournalismus:

Palestinians Dream of Return (June 2014)

A lifetime has passed since hundreds of thousands of Palestinians fled or were forced out their homes in the Mideast war over Israel’s 1948 creation.

Today, those who were uprooted and their descendants number more than 5 million people, scattered across the West Bank, Gaza Strip, Jordan, Syria and Lebanon. About one-third of the refugees still live in camps, or tent cities that have been transformed into crowded urban slums. Some families live in the camps for the fourth generation.

The plight of millions of refugees everywhere is marked June 20, 2014 on World Refugee Day. The United Nations Refugee Agency says that at the end of 2013, more than 50 million people have been forced to flee their homes worldwide, the highest figure of displacement since World War II.

More than 700,000 Palestinians fled or were driven out in the 1948 Mideast war, according to U.N. figures. The war began after Israel declared its independence and surrounding Arab nations invaded. Tens of thousands more Palestinians were displaced in the 1967 war in which Israel captured the West Bank, Gaza and east Jerusalem.

In the Jenin camp in the northern West Bank, murals express the hardships of life in exile and the yearning to return to what is now Israel. 

Fatimah Jalamneh, 85, spends her day sitting by the doorway of her house in an alley in the camp. She was in her late teens when her family fled from the village of Noures near what is now the Israeli town of Afula. ”Until death takes me away, my only dream is to go back to my village and sit under a tree in my home which was taken away from me and my children,” said Jalamneh, a great-grandmother.

Abduljalil Al-Noursi, 70, sat in front of a large mural showing a ship and the words “We will return” written on the sail. Al-Nursi was 4 years old when he and 19 relatives fled with just the clothes on their backs. “I won’t let go of my right of return,” he said.

The fate of the Palestinian refugees is one of the most explosive issues in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, with Israel saying it cannot accept a mass return because that would dilute the state’s Jewish majority. Palestinian negotiators say each refugee has the right to choose between return and resettling, whether in a future state of Palestine or a third country.

Photos by Muhammed Muheisen/AP

Reblogged from fotojournalismus
Tags: refugees

thebowspring:

thebowspring:

What’s a Palestinian life worth compared to an Israeli?

Israeli forces shot and killed 13-year-old Mohammed Dudin this morning as they continued terrorizing the Palestinian population in what they say is a search for 3 Israelis who are supposedly missing. This young boy was from Dura near the West Bank city of Hebron.

He is the third Palestinian to have been killed since Israel reported the disappearance of 3 settlers 8 days ago. 20-year-old Ahmad Sabarin was killed in Jalazoun Refugee Camp on Sunday and 7-year-old Ali Al-Awour from Gaza a day earlier

His friends looking at him for one last time before his burial:

Thirteen.

Reblogged from The Bow Spring
7odoud:

Dabke by the sea in Yaffa. 

7odoud:

Dabke by the sea in Yaffa. 

Reblogged from That New New
Tags: jaffa dabke
fixyourwritinghabits:

creativesocialworker:

Social Worker Tumblrs
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Reblogging in honor of the last day of Social Work Month.  These arent ranked in any particular order so check them all out.  If I missed you just let me know!

yo I’m reblogging this because it can seriously help folks out, definitely a list worth keeping.

fixyourwritinghabits:

creativesocialworker:

Social Worker Tumblrs

Therapist Tumblrs

Psychology Tumblrs

Recovery/Support Tumblrs

Reblogging in honor of the last day of Social Work Month.  These arent ranked in any particular order so check them all out.  If I missed you just let me know!

yo I’m reblogging this because it can seriously help folks out, definitely a list worth keeping.

Reblogged from That New New

thebowspring:

Ads Against Apartheid (AAA) launched these brilliant ads on the Boston subway system this week.

“The ads simply state the facts and are backed up with citations from credible human rights and international organizations, including the United Nations,” said Chadi Salamoun, the president of Ads Against Apartheid, who added that “if the ads are shocking, that’s because the reality on the ground is shocking.”

Richard Colbath-Hess, a Jewish-American faculty member at the University of Massachusetts, and the co-founder of Ads Against Apartheid, noted that “American tax dollars help the Israeli government maintain an incredibly brutal military occupation, which has denied the Palestinian people their basic rights for decades. These ads show what Israel’s occupation and apartheid really look like, and it is important for Americans to see that.”

Read more at Mondoweiss

Reblogged from The Bow Spring
There are many pieces that make up our lives: Moments that break us. Moments that raise and shape us. Decisions we make to hold on. Or let go. People who enter our lives and leave us changed forever. The ones we love, the ones that hurt us, or heal us, or leave us. Sometimes we don’t understand these pieces—or even despair over them. It’s only when time goes by and we look back, that we suddenly can see our whole life like a perfectly designed puzzle. 
Don’t be afraid of the puzzle piece you’re in right now. It will fit perfectly…just like the rest. How could it not? 
The Designer is perfect.
— Yasmin Mogahed (via skycloudsky)
Tags: reflections
thebowspring:

(Al-Monitor) Gaza Strip — Seven years ago, in the old Shujaiyya neighborhood in eastern Gaza City, the artistic talent of Mohammad Qureiqai, 12, was discovered as he was making pencil sketches in his notebook. His journey of being acknowledged as a creative artist began.
Mohammad’s eldest brother, Malek, 23, could not believe his eyes when he saw a sketch drawn by Mohammad, who was only five years old at the time. He asked him to redo the sketch multiple times, to make sure that Mohammad had worked on it by himself. Then, Malek started to help him with the drawings, assisting him in coming up with new ideas for his paintings, which were initially produced using only pencil and charcoal.

Al-Monitor met Mohammad in his humble studio, a small room on the rooftop of his two-story house. After school, Mohammad spends long hours in the studio, where he has placed the oil and pencil paintings he produced over seven years ago.

Each painting has a story, and whenever the young artist is asked about a certain painting, he recounts how he came up with the idea and drew it, and the time it took him to make it ready for display. Mohammad was asked to produce some paintings to display in exhibitions about Palestinian causes, like prisoners in Israeli jails, the Nakba and other subjects. However, he is most interested in the paintings whose ideas he has come up with, and he enjoys talking about them at length.
“I go to sleep and wake up dreaming of new drawings. My life has now become my drawings and paintings. Everything you see around me are ideas for old or new paintings,” Mohammad said with a shy smile, explaining the importance painting holds for him.

Mohammad hails from a middle-class family and has three sisters and five brothers. His eldest brother Malek describes Mohammad, saying, “Mohammad’s talent as an artist is already excellent, but for a 12-year-old boy, it is extraordinary.”
Mohammad participated in nine exhibitions in the Gaza Strip, collectively or individually, the majority of which were organized by local and governmental institutions. He also participated in an exhibition in Beirut organized by the Palestinian Embassy in Lebanon. He was also supposed to participate in an exhibition in South Africa, but he could not travel or send his paintings, so his works were photographed and scanned and then put on display.

Israel refused to give Mohammad a permit to travel to Bethlehem to participate in painting the “peace mural through the eyes of children amid occupation” in 2012, which deprived him of the chance to work with both Palestinian and foreign children to create the mural.
The majority of Mohammad’s paintings depict cartoon characters he watches on TV. He also tries to come up with short stories for children by drawing characters and writing dialogue.

He tries to develop his painting skills through self-learning on the Internet, examining the paintings of other artists and continuously watching videos on YouTube that explain the correct methods to paint objects in such a way that they appear three dimensional.
“With the help of my brother Malek, I try to learn new drawing methods by using the Internet, and find ideas to put on canvas,” he said.

Mohammad is facing a problem by the lack of sponsorship from official and local institutions and the scarcity of financial resources, depriving him of the ability to afford painting equipment. This is why he has to wait until some institutions commission him to produce paintings before he can purchase supplies. Also, his studio lacks an easel, which means he has to draw while lying on the ground on his stomach.
Mohammad, despite his young age, knows the names of internationally renowned artists, and says that Dutch painter Vincent van Gogh is inspirational to him. “I, like [Pablo] Picasso, draw using the left hand,” he lightheartedly said.

Local Palestinian artists complain about the lack of societal and official interest in art and painting, since — due to the difficult economic situation in Gaza — art is viewed as a luxury.
Mohammad said that those living near him and people he interacts with do not care about art and painting.
“My neighbors told me more than once: ‘Drawing is useless. Work to make a living,’” he said.
Mohammad is determined to become an internationally renowned artist, saying, “I want to study fine arts after I finish school to develop my capacities and talent,” adding, “I hope to live outside Palestine where art and drawing are valued, and where I can meet international and famous artists.”
All photos of Mohammad Qureiqai, 12, with his paintings and sketches at his home in Gaza City, May 13, 2014. Taken by: Hazem Balousha

thebowspring:

(Al-Monitor) Gaza Strip — Seven years ago, in the old Shujaiyya neighborhood in eastern Gaza City, the artistic talent of Mohammad Qureiqai, 12, was discovered as he was making pencil sketches in his notebook. His journey of being acknowledged as a creative artist began.

Mohammad’s eldest brother, Malek, 23, could not believe his eyes when he saw a sketch drawn by Mohammad, who was only five years old at the time. He asked him to redo the sketch multiple times, to make sure that Mohammad had worked on it by himself. Then, Malek started to help him with the drawings, assisting him in coming up with new ideas for his paintings, which were initially produced using only pencil and charcoal.

Al-Monitor met Mohammad in his humble studio, a small room on the rooftop of his two-story house. After school, Mohammad spends long hours in the studio, where he has placed the oil and pencil paintings he produced over seven years ago.

Each painting has a story, and whenever the young artist is asked about a certain painting, he recounts how he came up with the idea and drew it, and the time it took him to make it ready for display. Mohammad was asked to produce some paintings to display in exhibitions about Palestinian causes, like prisoners in Israeli jails, the Nakba and other subjects. However, he is most interested in the paintings whose ideas he has come up with, and he enjoys talking about them at length.

“I go to sleep and wake up dreaming of new drawings. My life has now become my drawings and paintings. Everything you see around me are ideas for old or new paintings,” Mohammad said with a shy smile, explaining the importance painting holds for him.

Mohammad hails from a middle-class family and has three sisters and five brothers. His eldest brother Malek describes Mohammad, saying, “Mohammad’s talent as an artist is already excellent, but for a 12-year-old boy, it is extraordinary.”

Mohammad participated in nine exhibitions in the Gaza Strip, collectively or individually, the majority of which were organized by local and governmental institutions. He also participated in an exhibition in Beirut organized by the Palestinian Embassy in Lebanon. He was also supposed to participate in an exhibition in South Africa, but he could not travel or send his paintings, so his works were photographed and scanned and then put on display.

Israel refused to give Mohammad a permit to travel to Bethlehem to participate in painting the “peace mural through the eyes of children amid occupation” in 2012, which deprived him of the chance to work with both Palestinian and foreign children to create the mural.

The majority of Mohammad’s paintings depict cartoon characters he watches on TV. He also tries to come up with short stories for children by drawing characters and writing dialogue.

He tries to develop his painting skills through self-learning on the Internet, examining the paintings of other artists and continuously watching videos on YouTube that explain the correct methods to paint objects in such a way that they appear three dimensional.

“With the help of my brother Malek, I try to learn new drawing methods by using the Internet, and find ideas to put on canvas,” he said.

Mohammad is facing a problem by the lack of sponsorship from official and local institutions and the scarcity of financial resources, depriving him of the ability to afford painting equipment. This is why he has to wait until some institutions commission him to produce paintings before he can purchase supplies. Also, his studio lacks an easel, which means he has to draw while lying on the ground on his stomach.

Mohammad, despite his young age, knows the names of internationally renowned artists, and says that Dutch painter Vincent van Gogh is inspirational to him. “I, like [Pablo] Picasso, draw using the left hand,” he lightheartedly said.

Local Palestinian artists complain about the lack of societal and official interest in art and painting, since — due to the difficult economic situation in Gaza — art is viewed as a luxury.

Mohammad said that those living near him and people he interacts with do not care about art and painting.

“My neighbors told me more than once: ‘Drawing is useless. Work to make a living,’” he said.

Mohammad is determined to become an internationally renowned artist, saying, “I want to study fine arts after I finish school to develop my capacities and talent,” adding, “I hope to live outside Palestine where art and drawing are valued, and where I can meet international and famous artists.”

All photos of Mohammad Qureiqai, 12, with his paintings and sketches at his home in Gaza City, May 13, 2014. Taken by: Hazem Balousha

Reblogged from The Bow Spring
Tags: gaza art

myvoicemyright:

A Rarely Seen Photo Archive Tells The Story Of The Palestinian Exodus

On Thursday, Palestinians mark the “Nakba” or “catastrophe” – the name they use for their uprooting during the war over Israel’s creation in 1948. In honor of the day, the UN has digitized more than 525,000 photos, most of which have never been seen before.

Reblogged from That New New
Tags: nakba

"millions of flower petals erupt from a volcano, covering an entire village" - (via sunnyskyz, with photos by nick meek)


A Palestinian man shouts for help moments after Palestinian teen, Mohammad Abu Daher, on the ground, was shot to death by Israeli troops near the West Bank city of Ramallah, on May 15, 2014.
Officials at Ramallah Hospital say the two, ages 15 and 17, were shot in the upper body by live fire. (AP Photo/Majdi Mohammed)

A Palestinian man shouts for help moments after Palestinian teen, Mohammad Abu Daher, on the ground, was shot to death by Israeli troops near the West Bank city of Ramallah, on May 15, 2014.

Officials at Ramallah Hospital say the two, ages 15 and 17, were shot in the upper body by live fire. (AP Photo/Majdi Mohammed)

Reblogged from Palestina